/ The mortal soul of freedom


When the Cold War came to an end, the political system of liberal democracy emerged as the clear winner. Only 25 years have passed since then, yet this assumption is already on shaky ground. The influence of autocrats around the world who reject liberal ideals is growing. Populism is broadening its support base on the left and right. Dr Marco Buschmann, MP in the Bundestag and parliamentary secretary of the FDP in the Bundestag explains why things have gone this far and specifically what we can do to reinforce the concepts of freedom and equality in his book ‘Die sterbliche Seele der Freiheit’ (The mortal soul of freedom), named after Greek philosopher Plato’s theory of the mortal soul. Political concepts, according to Dr Buschmann’s theory, can only be effective if they touch a person’s character, i.e. the ‘mortal part of their soul’.

“It’s a complex book,” said Wolfgang Schäuble, President of the German Bundestag, at the beginning of a Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom event to present the book. But that’s only natural when an author attempts to explain the potency of liberalism, basing his arguments on the strengths of a liberal democracy on numerous classic texts.

“It’s a complex book,” said Dr Wolfgang Schäuble, President of the German Bundestag, at the beginning of a Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom event to present the book. But that’s only natural when an author attempts to explain the potency of liberalism, basing his arguments on the strengths of a liberal democracy on numerous classic texts.

“Tolerance reinforces our basic democratic principles and the constitutional state. A stable democratic order must embrace all members of society – otherwise there can be no freedom,” analysed Dr Wolfgang Schäuble at the presentation of ‘Die sterbliche Seele der Freiheit’ by Dr Marco Buschmann.

One of Dr Buschmann’s main objectives, said Dr Schäu­ble, is to demonstrate why, in a liberal system, we must make room for everyone, despite having our own priorities. He also emphasised the importance of respecting, acknowledging and considering the opinions of others.y

// If all we do is shout at each other or seek approval in our social networks, instead of objectively discussing thesis and antithesis, the political debate will become so pathetic that it ultimately loses its integrative power (…)

said Dr Schäuble. Tolerance therefore reinforces our basic democratic order and the constitutional state. A stable democratic order must embrace all members of society – otherwise there can be no freedom.

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